What to Do If Your Current Tenants Refuse Viewings for New Tenants: A Landlord Guide

Finding new tenants for your property is essential for keeping your rental business thriving. However, what should you do if your current tenants refuse to allow viewings for new tenants? This can be a challenging situation to navigate, but it’s important to understand your rights as a landlord and how to communicate effectively with your tenants. In this guide, we’ll explore some tips for handling this situation and finding new tenants for your property.

Know Your Rights as a Landlord

As a landlord, you have the right to access your property for certain purposes, including conducting viewings for potential new tenants. However, you must give your current tenants reasonable notice before entering the property. Typically, this is at least 24 hours’ notice, and it must be in writing.

If your tenants refuse to allow viewings, you may be able to take legal action to gain access to the property. However, it’s always best to try to resolve the situation through communication first.

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      Communicate Effectively with Your Tenants

      When your tenants refuse to allow viewings, it’s essential to communicate effectively with them. Try to understand their concerns and address them as best you can. For example, if your tenants are worried about the potential spread of COVID-19, you may be able to provide assurances that you’ll follow all necessary safety protocols during viewings.

      It’s also important to be clear about your expectations as a landlord. Explain to your tenants why viewings are necessary and how you plan to conduct them. Be open and honest about your intentions, and try to find a compromise that works for everyone.

      Provide Incentives for Your Tenants

      If your tenants are reluctant to allow viewings, consider offering incentives to encourage them to cooperate. For example, you could offer a discount on their rent or a gift card to a local restaurant or shop.

      By offering incentives, you show your tenants that you value their cooperation and are willing to work with them to find a solution. This can go a long way in building a positive relationship with your tenants and improving your chances of finding new tenants for your property.

      Advertise Your Property Effectively

      When your current tenants refuse viewings, it’s essential to advertise your property effectively to attract new tenants. This means using high-quality photos and descriptions on listing websites, highlighting any unique features of the property, and ensuring that your pricing is competitive.

      You may also want to consider working with a letting agent to help you find new tenants. They can handle all aspects of the process, including viewings, and can provide valuable expertise on pricing and marketing your property. Read more about these services that are provided at Home Made.

      FAQs

      Can I enter the property without my tenants’ permission to conduct viewings?

      No, you must give your tenants reasonable notice before entering the property for viewings.

      What should I do if my tenants continue to refuse viewings?

      If your tenants refuse to allow viewings, you may need to take legal action to gain access to the property. However, it’s always best to try to resolve the situation through communication first.

      Can I terminate my tenants’ lease if they refuse viewings?

      In most cases, you cannot terminate your tenants’ lease simply because they refuse viewings. However, if your lease agreement includes a clause that allows you to enter the property for viewings, you may be able to terminate the lease if your tenants refuse to comply.

      What if my tenants have a legitimate reason for refusing viewings?

      If your tenants have a legitimate reason for refusing viewings, such as a medical condition or disability, you may need to make reasonable accommodations to address their concerns. However, if there is no legitimate reason for their refusal, you can take legal action to gain access to the property.

      Conclusion

      Dealing with tenants who refuse viewings can be a frustrating and challenging situation for landlords. However, by understanding your rights, communicating effectively with your tenants, and offering incentives for cooperation, you can increase your chances of finding new tenants for your property without issue. Remember to always try to resolve the situation through communication first, and consider working with a letting agent to help you navigate the process.

      Free Landlord Resources

      Free Instant Valuation

      See how much your property could get in rent.

      Fee Saving Calculator

      See how much you could save on property fees.

      Yield calculator

      Calculate your rental yield with our simple tool

      Compliance checklist

      Make sure your buy-to-let property remains legal.

      Compliance Guide

      Download your complete landlord compliance guideĀ 

      Meet Sam your local Expert

      Sam has a wealth of experience across the private landlord and Build to Rent sectors. He has advised a wide range of clients across the whole of London on how to find great tenants, improve their assets and effectively market their properties for the best returns.

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